PHARMACY

Bristol-Myers Squibb, WuXi to open testing facility

BY Alaric DeArment

SHANGHAI — Drug maker Bristol-Myers Squibb is opening a new testing facility in China under collaboration with a local company there, Bristol said Monday.

WuXi PharmaTech will build, equip and operate the 25,000-sq.-ft. lab in Shanghai to store and test stability samples and perform other services for Bristol.

“This new agreement expands our already productive relationship with Bristol-Myers Squibb, a valued customer for many years,” WuXi CEO and chairman Ge Li said. “We will continue to help them to improve their [research and development] productivity with our innovation-driven, cost-effective and fully integrated R&D service platform.”

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PHARMACY

Innovation’s PharmAssist Symphony system achieves Microsoft certification

BY Alaric DeArment

JOHNSON CITY, N.Y. — Innovation’s PharmAssist Symphony pharmacy workflow system has received certification from Microsoft for applications running on Windows Server 2008 R2, Innovation said Friday.

The pharmacy automation company said the system was independently tested to meet the software giant’s standards for security, stability, availability, reliability and compatibility with the operating system.

The company said the certification built on its Gold Certified Partner status in the Microsoft Partner Program.

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Shortages linked with ethnic immunizations

BY Alaric DeArment

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — Delays or limits in the supply of flu vaccines can exacerbate disparities in vaccination rates among elderly whites, African-Americans and Hispanics, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Rochester and published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

The researchers, led by medical professor Yoo Byung-Kwang, found that the disparities in vaccination rates within the elderly population can widen by two to seven percentage points in years when problems with the vaccine supply emerge, depending on the severity of the problem, while narrowing by two to 11 percentage points when there are adequate supplies.

Yoo and the other researchers used data from the “Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey” and examined seasonal influenza vaccination rates from 2000 to 2005. Overall vaccination rates were more than 70% for whites, compared with 43% to 63% for blacks; among Hispanics, those who spoke English had vaccination rates of 58% to 75%, compared with 31% to 53% among those who spoke only Spanish.

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