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Bounty supports clean classrooms with ‘We Love Our School’ week

BY DSN STAFF

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble’s Bounty brand has partnered with PTO Today, an organization focused on filling unmet school needs through parent-teaching partnerships to promote clean, creative learning environments nationwide.

The "We Love Our School" week, which kicked off Monday, offers participating schools a Bounty Clean Kit with enough Bounty and Mr. Clean product to clean all of their classrooms. The cleaning program is helping to mobilize volunteers in 1,000 schools and 2,500 classrooms nationwide.

The program is an extension of P&G’s Make a Clean Difference campaign, which launched last year, and stemmed from a recent survey released by Bounty, which found that among 1,000 teachers polled, nearly all (94%) believed that students learn better in clean classrooms, and almost half of respondents (51%) said they avoid certain in-class projects or activities because they dread the clean-up.

"The clean learning environments provided through Bounty’s ‘We Love Our School’ Week program are needed now more than ever," said Dave Lee, Procter & Gamble North American Bounty delivery brand manager. "It’s surprising to learn that more than half of teachers surveyed acknowledged that the need to clean their classroom interferes with teaching. Through this program, we aim to help provide clean learning environments that allow students to learn uninhibited by messes."

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HHS unveils National Vaccine Plan

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Department of Health and Human Services on Wednesday unveiled a new National Vaccine Plan to enhance coordination of all aspects of federal vaccine and immunization activities with the goal to ensure that all Americans can gain access to vaccines.

“Vaccines are a critical cornerstone of the public health system,” stated Howard Koh, assistant secretary for health for HHS. “The National Vaccine Plan articulates a vision that will ensure that the nation’s prevention strategies protect the public for the next decade and beyond.”

The plan offers innovative approaches to improve delivery of existing vaccines and to spur development of new products to prevent infectious disease. And pharmacies play a role in expanding access to vaccines, the report acknowledged. “Barriers to improved vaccine uptake include persistent cost, awareness and access problems; lack of knowledge of necessary vaccines; and limited use of evidence-based strategies to improve vaccine uptake, such as reminder-recall systems,” the report read. “Community health centers, other community immunization sites (e.g., pharmacies and stores) and school-located clinics offer venues for improving vaccine uptake, in addition to traditional provider sites.”

“This plan is a 10-year vision for the nation to more effectively prevent infectious diseases and reduce adverse reactions to vaccines,” stated the director of the National Vaccine Program Office and deputy assistant secretary for health, Bruce Gellin. “The plan is national in scope. Implementation will require a well-organized effort among stakeholders, including federal, state and local policy-makers, healthcare providers, manufacturers, academia, philanthropic organizations and the public.”

Next steps include a series of regional meetings with stakeholders in the spring and summer of 2011, which will focus on how to implement the strategies laid out in the National Vaccine Plan. The final implementation plan will be completed by the end of 2011.

For more about the new National Vaccine Plan, click here.

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Employees’ job worries trump health concerns, survey finds

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — As employers try to engage employees in health management programs to slow healthcare cost inflation, fewer employees are placing a high priority on managing and improving their health, according to a survey released Wednesday of more than 9,000 employees at large and midsize employers, conducted by Towers Watson.

“As employees cope with a period of high financial and personal stress, the focus on improving health has taken a back seat,” stated Jeff Levin-Scherz, a physician and senior healthcare consultant at Towers Watson. “Chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, are the No. 1 driver of healthcare costs, and employers are increasingly committed to offering programs that can empower employees to manage their health and prevent the risks that lead to these diseases,” he said. “[But] our findings reveal that this strategy faces an uphill battle in the current economic environment.”

The Towers Watson survey found that there has been a significant decline in employees’ focus on health over the past two years. For example, only 59% of employee respondents believe that managing their health is a top priority, down from 69% in 2008; and 59% of respondents have taken actions in the last two years to significantly improve their health, down from 65% in 2008. Only 1-in-5 employees used employer lifestyle management programs, which is down from 26% in 2008.

However, employees increasingly are accepting of employers offering incentives/penalties for health status and wellness efforts. Two-in-3 employees (67%) would be comfortable if their health plan or employer-reduced premium costs for healthy workers and those willing to take steps to manage their illness or lower their health risks, up from 64% in 2008. Nearly half of employees (47%) would be comfortable if their health plan or employer increased the premium costs for workers unwilling to take steps to manage their illness or lower their health risks, up from 39% in 2008.

On the positive side, employee awareness of their health risks is rising, with more employees participating in health-screening programs. According to the survey, 43% of employees completed a health risk assessment, up from 26% in 2008. In addition, 31% completed a biometric screening for body mass index and cholesterol and glucose levels, up from 18% in 2008.

Employees in poor health are the least engaged in the management of their health, and those in good health are the most engaged. Compared with healthy employees, those in poor health are less optimistic about their ability to improve their health and less likely than any other group to use employer wellness programs. Only 20% of employees in poor health are using programs to manage chronic conditions. In addition, employees in very good health (23%) are nearly twice as likely to use lifestyle management programs as those in poor health (13%).

Employees in poor health are less likely to believe their company promotes a healthy work environment (36% of employees with poor health versus 52% with very good health), are less likely to believe that managing health is a top priority (44% versus 68%) and are less likely to have taken actions in the last two years to significantly improve their health (45% versus 67%).

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