HEALTH

Botox approved for migraines

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. A popular beauty treatment has won approval as a medical treatment as well.

 

The Food and Drug Administration announced Friday the approval of Allergan’s Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) for preventing headaches in adult patients with chronic migraine.

 

 

“Chronic migraine is one of the most disabling forms of headache,” FDA division of neurology products director Russell Katz said. “Patients with chronic migraine experience a headache more than 14 days of the month. This condition can greatly affect family, work and social life, so it’s important to have a variety of effective treatments available.”

 

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D.CALABRESE says:
Sep-02-2013 09:43 pm

Can you please share what are the chemicals or ingredients used with this botox treatment? Surely they have included something on it that will help cure and prevent chronic migraine. Also, please include what are the suggested ages for a person to have this treatment. I’d also ask my friend from colleyville botox about it. Wish to get the important information from this treatment.

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Medco: Poor adherence may cause lack of response to medication

BY Alaric DeArment

BOSTON When a patient isn’t showing a response to a medication, a common tactic the doctor might use is to increase the dosage. According to a new study, however, the ineffectiveness might be happening because the patient isn’t properly taking the medication.

The Medco Research Institute, the research arm of pharmacy benefit manager Medco Health Solutions, found that nearly one-third of patients given increased dosages of antidepressants were not regularly taking their original prescriptions. Data from the study recently were presented at the American Psychiatric Association’s 62nd Institute on Psychiatric Services in Boston.

 

Medco said the study showed doctors should monitor a patient’s adherence to their antidepressants before raising the dosage because poor adherence may contribute to disease relapse, thus leading to unnecessary dosage increases.

 

 

“A physician usually increases a dose when a patient is not responding to the current dosage,” Medco Neuroscience Therapeutic Resource Center national practice leader and lead study author David Muzina said. “But the analysis shows that the reason the dose may not be effective is that many patients are not taking their antidepressants as directed.”

 

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Diabetes-related hospitalizations on the rise, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK More young adults, particularly young women, are being hospitalized for diabetes-related issues, according to a new study.

The study — published online in the Oct. 12 edition of Journal of Women’s Health, led by Joyce Lee of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and colleagues — evaluated hospital discharges with a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 1993 and 2006.

Lee and colleagues found that hospital discharges associated with diabetes rose 65.3% over the 14-year period, as women were about 1.3 times more likely to be in the hospital for diabetes-related issues than men; while diabetes-related hospitalizations rose 102% among adults ages 30 years to 39 years. The changes, the investigators noted, "signal a shift in the hospital burden of diabetes."

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