PHARMACY

Blood Sugar Basics Game Plan seeks to help Type 2 diabetics better manage condition

BY Allison Cerra

PHILADELPHIA — An interactive user-friendly program that breaks down diabetes management into four goals to help people with Type 2 diabetes better manage their disease has made its debut.

Developed by the American College of Endocrinology with support from drug maker Merck, the Blood Sugar Basics Game Plan, available on BloodSugarBasics.com, outlines four personalized goals — Huddle, Enter the Nutrition Zone, Get in the Game, and Check the Scoreboard — that people with Type 2 diabetes can put into practice with the help of a healthcare professional. The website also includes such resources as questions to ask your doctor, tips about managing high and low blood sugar, a blood sugar knowledge quiz and checklists on how to help get through episodes of low and high blood sugar.

The Blood Sugar Basics Game Plan is supported by "coaches," including Mike Golic, co-host of ESPN’s "Mike & Mike in the Morning" and a former National Football League star, who has Type 2 diabetes; clinical endocrinologist Farhad Zangeneh and Samantha Heller, a registered dietitian and exercise physiologist with expertise in diabetes.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
PHARMACY

Electronic prescribing spreads like wildfire among retail pharmacies

BY Alaric DeArment

Big trends can sometimes take centuries or even millennia to develop. Think about how long it took between the dawn of anatomically modern humans and the adoption of agriculture. Health care is no different, having come a long way since the days of bloodletting and the assorted quackeries that were once considered acceptable medical practices.

But there’s one trend in health care that has happened with astonishing speed, particularly in the United States: the adoption of electronic prescribing. According to the latest numbers from e-prescribing network Surescripts, there were 16,000 office-based prescribers who had adopted e-prescribing in 2006. Within two years, that number climbed to 74,000, but that still represented only 12% of the total. By 2011, however, that number had reached 390,000 — 54% of all prescribers in the country. The numbers from the pharmacy side have increased even faster. In 2008, 46,000 pharmacy retailers, or 76%, were set up for e-prescribing; in 2011, it was 56,900, or 91%. Of those, chains have adopted the technology to the greatest degree, with 98% of chain pharmacies using it, compared with 79% of independents. According to Surescripts, of the 62,461 community pharmacies in the United States, 64% are part of a chain, while 36% are independents.

One case in particular is Walgreens, which in March announced a program with Surescripts whereby it would send immunization records directly from Walgreens and Duane Reade stores, and Take Care Clinics, to primary care providers using Surescripts’ Clinical Interoperability services, with plans to share immunization data with public health authorities starting later this year.

Currently, the percentage of prescriptions transmitted electronically remains relatively small: In 2011, 570 million prescriptions, or 36%, were sent electronically — but compare that with 2008, when that figure was 68 million, or 5%. The reason for the discrepancy, according to Surescripts, is that actual use of e-prescribing tends to lag adoption, with the most recent adopters among prescribers using it less than those who adopted it in earlier years.

At the same time, adoption has been somewhat uneven when examined on a state-by-state level. So far, according to Surescripts, Massachusetts has seen the most comprehensive use of e-prescribing, while such states as Minnesota and Oregon have seen widespread use as well. On the other hand, adoption has been relatively light across Nevada and California, and appears almost nonexistent in all but a few portions of Alaska. Also, while e-prescribing is common in Dallas and Houston, it’s extremely rare, if not absent, in many other Texan counties, with Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota showing similar patterns.

One major reason why e-prescribing has seen such dramatic growth is government incentives under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008. According to a report released in February by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, nearly $271 million was paid to physicians as part of the eRx Incentive Program in 2010, an 83% increase over 2009, the first year of the program, when the program paid out $148 million. The payments went to 65,857 individual professionals and 18,713 practices. The CMS report also found that almost 700,000 professionals were qualified to participate in the eRx Incentive Program in 2010, compared with close to 669,700 in 2009.

At press time, CMS didn’t have complete data for 2011, but it found that by 2011, 160,959 eligible professionals, or 26.3% of those eligible, had submitted data for the eRx measure through claims.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
PHARMACY

Pfizer names president, general manager of emerging markets, established business products

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — Pfizer has named one of its executives to a new position.

Olivier Brandicourt — Pfizer’s president and general manager of the primary care business unit and a member of the Pfizer executive leadership team — has been appointed president and general manager of the company’s emerging markets and established business products business units, effective June 1. He succeeds David Simmons, who is leaving Pfizer to become the chairman and CEO of Pharmaceutical Product Development.

Taking over Brandicourt’s role is John Young, who currently is regional president of Europe and Canada for the primary care business.

"Olivier is ideally suited to take on this new role," Pfizer chairman and CEO Ian Read said. "He has more than 20 years of global experience in the pharmaceutical industry. Olivier is both a physician and proven business leader who understands the many challenges of today’s changing industry and healthcare landscape."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...