PHARMACY

Blacks, Hispanics more likely to perceive generics as inferior

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Negative perceptions of generic drugs are more likely among blacks and Hispanics, according to a new study.

The study, published in the journal Ethnicity & Disease, found that negative perceptions of generic drugs were more widespread among ethnic minorities than among whites.

The researchers found no significant differences by race or ethnicity in the use of generic drug discount programs, and about 75% of participants agreed that generics are equal in quality or just as safe or effective as branded drugs, but negative perceptions about the potential for side effects and about inferiority of generics were more pronounced among minority group members than among whites. Blacks and Hispanics were 10 times more likely than whites to agree that generic drugs had more side effects than branded drugs and four times more likely than whites to agree that generics were inferior to branded drugs, though the perceptions did not prevent minorities from using generics.

The researchers conducted a survey of Houston residents with incomes less than $30,000 per year with a chronic condition requiring a prescription drug or a family member with such a condition; 67% of respondents were African-American; and 77% were couple.

"A lot of people can’t afford their medicine; they end up in the [emergency room] for something preventable," Kellogg Health Scholars researcher and lead study author Anthony Omojasola said. "We wanted to see if people were aware of generic drug discount programs and, if they were aware, why they would or would not participate."


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PHARMACY

Reports: Merz Pharmaceuticals sues Par over cerebral palsy drug

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Drug maker Merz Pharmaceuticals is suing Par Pharmaceutical over the latter’s attempt to market a generic drug for cerebral palsy patients, according to published reports.

Bloomberg reported that Merz sued Par in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware after Par attempted to apply for Food and Drug Administration approval for a generic version of Cuvposa (glycopyrrolate) oral solution, used to treat severe drooling in cerebral palsy patients.

The drug received FDA approval this year, and Merz bought rights to the drug in August.


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S.ADAMS says:
Dec-18-2012 11:41 pm

How he has applied for the Food and Drug Administration..? How much time will it take to be approved..? estimation immobiliere

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Generic drug safety labels often contain incorrect information, study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

INDIANAPOLIS — More than two-thirds of generic drugs carry safety warning labels different from those of their branded equivalents, according to a new study.

Researchers at the Regenstrief Institute, a research organization supported by the Regenstrief Foundation and located on the campus of Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, reviewed 9,105 product labels for more than 1,500 drugs available on the Food and Drug Administration’s and National Library of Medicine’s online labeling information repository DailyMed. Of more than 1,040 drugs with more than one manufacturer’s label, 68% had discrepancies within their safety information.

Using a software program they developed, the researchers found that most of the generic showed relatively small differences, but 9% showed differences of more than 10 side effects, and other errors included out-of-date information, incomplete data and one that had information for the wrong drug. The study was published online in the journal Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety and will be published in the print edition as well.

"Physicians frequently use labeling information, either directly or indirectly, to make prescribing decisions," lead study investigator and Indiana University professor of medicine Jon Duke said. "They need to know about side effects, drug interactions and other safety issues. We found that generic drug labels may contain incomplete or incorrect safety information. Until this problem is resolved, physicians and patients should rely on brand drug labeling only, even when the patient is getting a generic version of a drug."


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