HEALTH

Berkeley launches ActivaMune immune support formula

BY Michael Johnsen

BERKELEY, Calif. Berkeley BioSciences on Monday launched ActivaMune—an advanced immune support formula exclusively licensed from UC Berkeley.

ActivaMune is based on a discovery regarding the immune activating properties of Diindolylmethane, a naturally occurring compound found in Brassica vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts). This compound has been shown to modulate key immune enhancing cytokines, which are groups of proteins and peptides that are used in organisms as signaling compounds. These chemical signals are similar to hormones and neurotransmitters and are used to allow one cell to communicate with another. 

DIM, at dietary supplemental dosages, is currently used as a treatment for recurring respiratory papillomatosis tumors (caused by the human papillomavirus), the company reported, and is in Phase III clinical trials for cervical dysplasia, which is also caused by HPV. Diindolylmethane is currently under investigation as a natural therapeutic for most viral infections, including HPV, influenza, hepatitis and HIV as well as antibiotic resistant bacteria.

As DIM has both immune modulating properties that fight cancer, as well as direct anti-cancer properties, it is also currently in clinical trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute as a natural therapeutic for various forms of cancer.

Epidemiological studies have indicated that people who regularly consume Brassica vegetables have a significantly lower risk of cancer. Scientists believe that the three principal nutrients in Brassica vegetables responsible for these protective properties are: Diindolylmethane, sulforaphane and selenium. ActivaMune is the first dietary supplement in the market to deliver all three of these nutrients from Brassica vegetables in one capsule.

Proceeds from ActivaMune sales support research and development of nature-based therapeutics for cancer, AIDS and other diseases.

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Adams files suit against Perrigo for Mucinex patent infringement

BY Michael Johnsen

CHESTER, N.J. Adams Respiratory Therapeutics on Thursday announced that it has filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey against Perrigo for patent infringement of its Mucinex line of oral solid, extended-release guaifenesin products. Adams claims that the patents protecting Mucinex don’t expire until 2020.

Adams filed the lawsuit in response to Perrigo’s notification that it filed a Paragraph IV Certification in connection with its Abbreviated New Drug Application, which seeks Food and Drug Administration approval to engage in the commercial manufacture, use or sale of guaifenesin 600 mg single-ingredient, extended-release tablets (equivalent to Adams’ Mucinex SE), prior to the expiration of the patent. This patent infringement lawsuit will automatically stay the FDA from approving Perrigo’s ANDA until the earlier of 30 months or until a district court rules in favor of Perrigo.

Adams markets six patent-protected extended-release guaifenesin products over-the-counter under the Mucinex brand name, including a new line of 1,200 mg maximum-strength products. These products are the only available FDA-approved extended-release guaifenesin products, the company claimed. Perrigo’s ANDA relates only to guaifenesin 600 mg single-ingredient, extended-release tablets.

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Survey results show baby boomers’ pains affect their active lifestyles

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. Results from a new national “Pain Poll” survey issued Friday of 50-something baby boomers found that while 77 percent of boomers think “50 is the new 40,” unfortunately 55 percent of baby boomers said that their aches and pains have affected their ability to maintain an active lifestyle.

The good news for 50-somethings is that 72 percent of males and females surveyed by the Pain Poll feel mentally 10 years younger than the age on their driver’s license; in contrast, the poll showed that 62 percent of 50-somethings feel physically the same as or older than the age on their driver’s license.

Overall, the Pain Poll found that 92 percent of 50-somethings have experienced aches and pains, and 52 percent said they experience aches and pains on a daily basis.

“Remaining active and exercising for 50-somethings may be harder because of increased joint and early osteoarthritis pain, but at this age it is important to keep exercising because this will strengthen muscles and help to reduce stress on the joints that they support,” stated Dr. Rosa Solorio.

Solorio is working with McNeil Consumer Healthcare, with support from the Arthritis Foundation, to help educate 50-something baby boomers about the importance of exercising and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The education initiative includes the Keep Moving program, which was initiated by McNeil.

The Pain Poll was sponsored by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the makers of Tylenol, and conducted by Harris Interactive.

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