HEALTH

Bainbridge & Knight launch new probiotic

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Bainbridge & Knight on Tuesday announced the introduction of Lichi Super Fruit Super Probiotic, formulated with three strains of probiotic bacteria — Bifidobacterium lactis B1-04, BioOptima Saccharomyces boulardii and Lactospore.

These multiple strains work together as part of a fastest-acting formula available, the company stated. Additionally, these patented probiotic strains are better protected from stomach acids, ensuring guaranteed delivery and maximum absorption.

A daily dose of Lichi Super Fruit Super Probiotic has been clinically proven to restore digestion, reclaim regularity, promote immunity and increase healthy bacteria levels in the digestive system. In comparison to other probiotic products, the Lichi Super Fruit Super Probiotic delivers 4 billion CFUs (colony forming units) of beneficial bacteria to the digestive tract in a single serving for most effective results.

Available at GNC, Walgreens and Rite Aid, Lichi Super Fruit Super Probiotic retails for a suggested $19.99.

 


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Lansinoh Momma bottle with NaturalWave peristaltic nipple makes its debut

BY Allison Cerra

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Lansinoh is expanding its Momma bottle brand to aid mothers’ breast-feeding routines.

The new Momma bottle featuring the NaturalWave peristaltic nipple is designed to reduce potential nipple confusion in babies where the breast-feeding relationship already has been established, Lansinoh said. The bottle’s patented nipple, Lansinoh said, encourages the same process used by babies to remove milk from their mother (known as peristaltic movement) and helps babies seamlessly shift from the breast to the bottle and back by maintaining familiarity with natural breast-feeding patterns.

In addition to facilitating extended breast-feeding, the NaturalWave peristaltic nipple also:

  • Has a wide, rounded nipple base which encourages a wider latch-on, similar to how babies latch naturally, and therefore promotes oral, facial, and jaw development;

  • Is made of super-soft and flexible 100% silicone that is lined internally with specially designed grooves that are made to optimally compress and control milk flow;

  • Has a hassle-free design with minimal parts that saves mom time;

  • Is available in slow, medium, and fast flow to meet baby’s changing needs;

  • Features an AVS Air Ventilation System that reduces the intake of gas, a potential cause of colic or spit up; and

  • Is BPA-free.

"When milk flows too quickly or easily out of a common, artificial nipple, there’s a risk that breastfed babies will opt to use the ‘easier’ method, and might start to prefer the artificial nipple over mom," said Gina Ciagne, certified lactation counselor and senior director for professional relations at Lansinoh. "We want to ensure that breast-feeding continues as long as possible, even if mom and baby are apart. Our NaturalWave peristaltic nipple encourages the baby to draw the milk out using the same oral and tongue movements as when breast-feeding, controlling the flow with a series of sucks and pauses, making this an option specially designed for breast-feeding moms."

The Lansinoh Momma bottle featuring the NaturalWave peristaltic nipple is available at Walmart (in store and online), Target (in store and online), Drugstore.com and more.


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CDC report: Some ethnic groups need to boost vitamin D, iron supplementation

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — Overall, the U.S. population has good levels of vitamin A and folate in the body, but some groups still need to increase their levels of vitamin D and iron, according to the "Second National Report on Biochemical Indicators of Diet and Nutrition," released Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"These findings are a snapshot of our nation’s overall nutrition status," said Christopher Portier, director of CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. "Measurements of blood and urine levels of these nutrients are critical because they show us whether the sum of nutrient intakes from foods and vitamin supplements is too low, too high or sufficient."

The report found the highest rates of vitamin D deficiency in non-Hispanic African-Americans (31%) despite clinical data showing greater bone density and fewer fractures in this group. Further research is needed to explain why non-Hispanic African-Americans have better bone health yet have a higher rate of vitamin D deficiency. According to the report, the vitamin D deficiency rate for Mexican-Americans was 12%, while for non-Hispanic whites, it was 3%.
 
Findings were not as encouraging with regard to the iodine status in young women (ages 20 to 39 years). This age group had iodine levels that were just above iodine insufficiency. The young women also had the lowest iodine levels among any age group of women. Iodine is an essential component of thyroid hormones that regulate human growth and development. Iodine deficiency disorders include mental retardation, hypothyroidism, goiter, cretinism and varying degrees of other growth and developmental abnormalities. Iodine is especially important in women during childbearing years to ensure the best possible brain development of the fetus during pregnancy.

Using a new marker of iron status, the report indicated higher rates of iron deficiency in Mexican-American children ages 1 to 5 years (11%) and in non-Hispanic African-Americans (16%) and Mexican-American women (13%) of childbearing age (ages 12 to 49 years) when compared with other race/ethnic groups. The new iron marker measurements will help clinicians better interpret iron status in individuals, especially in persons with chronic disease that includes inflammation, such as certain cancers.
 
"Research shows that good nutrition can help lower people’s risk for many chronic diseases. For most nutrients, the low deficiency rates, less than 1% to 10%, are encouraging, but higher deficiency rates in certain age and race/ethnic groups are a concern and need additional attention," said Christine Pfeiffer, lead researcher in the Division of Laboratory Sciences in CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health.

CDC’s "Second Nutrition Report" established blood and urine reference levels for 58 biochemical indicators; more than twice as many indicators as its first report, published in 2008. The report included first-time data for a new indicator of iron deficiency and for 24 healthy and unhealthy fatty acids.

The report provided first-time data on blood levels of fatty acids in the U.S. population, including both heart healthy polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as saturated fatty acids that increase risk of heart disease. These first time measurements provide a baseline that will allow CDC to track fatty acid levels over time, which will evaluate our nation’s progress toward heart healthy diets.

For the full nutrition report, click here.


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