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Anheuser-Busch agrees to $52 billion acquisition by InBev

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK InBev’s quest to buy Anheuser-Busch came to an end Monday as the St. Louis-based brewer of Budweiser agreed to an acquisition by the Leuven, Belgium-based brewer for $52 billion, according to a joint statement.

The deal was controversial, with city officials from St. Louis and Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt speaking out against it. At the same time, President and chief executive officer August Busch IV refused to sell, prompting InBev to attempt a hostile takeover.

Anheuser-Busch, which InBev bought for $70 per share, had been the second largest brewer in the world and an American icon that various members of the Anheuser and Busch families had controlled since 1860. InBev, with roots dating back to 1366, was, and still is, the largest, the result of a 2004 merger between Belgium’s Interbrew and Brazil’s AmBev.

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InBev ups the stakes in Anheuser-Busch offer

BY Jenna Duncan

BRUSSELS Reports today stated that InBev, maker of Stella Artois and Beck’s beers, among others, has raised its offer to buy out St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch stocks from $65 per share to $70.

After Anheuser-Busch, maker of Budweiser and Bud Light, denied the original bid of around $46 billion, InBev countered with a new offer of about $50 billion dollars.

Despite A-B’s initial resistance and claims that InBev may not have the best interests for A-B’s shareholders in mind, sources today said that A-B’s board is predicted to accept the new offer sometime this weekend. Although, some plans regarding A-B’s commitments to both its employees and wholesalers would still have to be ironed out, should a “friendly takeover” occur.

Meanwhile, A-B stocks gained a 7.69 percent increase to $65.92 dollars, which topped the original stockholder buyout offer from InBev of $65 per share.

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Report claims risks of secondhand smoke inhalation on decline

BY Jenna Duncan

ATLANTA Even though there is still concern that almost half of the population of American nonsmokers still inhale some cigarette fumes, a government study released yesterday said that the rate has declined significantly since the 1990s.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the amount of found in bars, restaurants work sites and other public places has been lessened substantially, thanks to smoking bans in such areas.

There has also been a decline drop in number of Americans who smoke, the researchers concluded. According to the CDC’s 2007 data, the number of smokers is down to less than 20 percent of U.S. adults.

Amounts of nicotine were found in blood taken 46 percent of a group of nonsmokers blood-tested during dates between 1999 through 2004. This was a notable decline from the late 1980s and early 1990s when around 84 percent of nonsmokers were found with rates of nicotine around the same levels.

The CDC was not ready to call the decline in numbers of smokers and nonsmokers exposed to smoke a total victory, however. Specialists warn that smoking is still deadly, causing lung cancer among other illnesses in smokers, and nonsmokers, as well.

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