PHARMACY

Affordable Care Act provision doesn’t fit healthcare puzzle

BY Alaric DeArment

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT — If the ultimate goal of the Affordable Care Act is to save money and expand patient care, then making patients visit their physicians and get prescriptions just to get reimbursed for over-the-counter medications — which wastes money, as well as the time of physicians, a precious commodity when the country is set to have a shortage of them — makes no sense.

(THE NEWS: Op-ed: CHPA, AMA call on Congress to repeal OTC Rx-only FSA provision. For the full story, click here)

When done responsibly, using OTCs to self-medicate for certain ailments can save patients a lot of money, especially when cheaper, private-label drugs are available. One reason why the United States spends so much money on health care while getting so little value in return is because of patients receiving care that ultimately proves unnecessary and redundant.

So it’s little wonder that American Medical Association president Peter Carmel joined Consumer Healthcare Products Association president and CEO Scott Melville in promoting the Restoring Access to Medication Act, which would repeal a counterproductive provision of the Affordable Care Act.

Of course, emphasis must be placed on the word “responsibly,” with regard to self-medication: the Great Recession prompted many American consumers to try and save money by switching from prescription drugs to cheaper OTC medications. In many cases, however, such decisions proved no wiser than not taking any medication, with research in early 2009 by the University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy turning up such examples as a woman who wound up in the hospital after replacing prescription blood-pressure medication with an herbal treatment.

But when the majority of physicians are recommending that patients try OTC medications to address certain ailments before going to the doctor, then it’s a bit of medical advice that Congress would do well to heed.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Walgreens raises the bar in pharmacist-patient interaction

BY Michael Johnsen

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT — If you want to change any kind of misguided perception that pharmacists are mere pill-counters and quality assurance specialists who stand behind a counter with a team of pharmacy technicians, then you’ve got to do something dramatic. Placing the pharmacist front and center in an "information booth" armed with a technophile-friendly iPad who is proactively interacting with patients — that’s dramatic.

(THE NEWS: Report: Walgreens places pharmacists in the aisles armed with iPads. For the full story, click here)

This kind of evolution, however, can become a game changer across a couple of fronts. Sure, it raises awareness around the value a pharmacist already delivers to overall healthcare to the nth degree. But the possible utility doesn’t end with easy Internet access to help answer health questions. The pharmacist can practically walk a patient through Walgreens’ Web page and open their eyes to more services and programs offered by the retailer. Beyond that it has potential to enhance medication therapy management-style offerings — what if a pharmacist could pull up a patient’s pharmacy profile and conduct a review on the spot?

And what possibilities does this open up for suppliers to help add value to this exchange?

Walgreens may not be the first pharmacy operator to raise awareness around just how accessible and informative a healthcare professional like the pharmacist can be by removing all barriers between them and their patient. It can be argued that small-box independents certainly have been up close and personal to their patients the longest, as attested to by the fact that independents always rank among the highest in customer service in J.D. Power’s annual pharmacy satisfaction survey. And then there’s Pharmaca, a slightly larger retail box that fields a whole host of healthcare professionals who actively interact with their guests.

But if Walgreens can expand such services as this chain wide, they’ll certainly be the largest pharmacy operator to place a pharmacist "in the aisles" on any kind of consistent basis. With the cost of tablets coming down, that shouldn’t be an inhibitor to blowing this out across more than 7,700 stores. That leaves the cost-prohibitive salary of the pharmacist — a professional who certainly makes a deal more than the average information booth clerk. But if Walgreens can quantify the return-on-investment — such as through substantial increases in patient retention, trips and marketbasket size or additional revenue streams, such as medication therapy management, then Walgreens will be well on its way to playing an even greater role in patient care than they already do.

The Internet-armed pharmacist is one of the healthcare innovations Walgreens showcased at the TEDMED conference in San Diego last month. Features of those stores include a pharmacist desk area in front of the pharmacy counter to provide greater customer access to the pharmacist; private and semi-private consultation rooms; an open and redesigned layout with expanded fresh food and beauty products, with more accessible shelving and checkout lines; and such technology as Walgreens Web Pickup, which allows customers to order online and pick up at the store and touchscreen kiosks that allow patients to quickly refill prescriptions.

“The concept is meant to create a pharmacy and health care ‘help desk’ where customers get solutions or referrals for their personal health questions,” Colin Watts, Walgreens chief innovation officer, told the Chicago daily.

The report identified the bigger picture behind the implementation of the "health guides." Beyond offering a greater level of personalized service, these guides help crystallize the role of the pharmacist beyond adjudicating prescriptions by increasing potential patient-pharmacist consultations.

A Chicago-based company, M-Healthcoach, won a competition against 24 other companies nationwide to develop the applications for Walgreens’ health guide initiative.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Octapharma USA to reintroduce immune disorder drug

BY Alaric DeArment

HOBOKEN, N.J. — The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the way for the return to market of a drug for treating immunodeficiency diseases following its recall by the manufacturer in response to patients developing internal blood clots.

Octapharma USA said Octagam (immune globulin intravenous [human]) 5% would be available for distribution in a few weeks. The company voluntarily withdrew selected lots of the drug in August 2010 when a number of patients using it experienced thromboembolic events, or TEEs, in which blood clots form in arteries and veins, break loose and are then carried by the bloodstream to block another blood vessel. Octapharma USA said the FDA has observed that a number of similar drugs can cause similar problems due to a blood-clotting factor called activated factor XI.

The company said it worked with the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research to develop and validate a scientific means of measuring and minimizing the amount of activated factor XI during the manufacturing process and in the finished product in order to prevent TEEs in the future.

"We are extremely pleased that the FDA has authorized the market return of Octacam 5%," Octapharma USA president Flemming Nielsen said. "Our collaboration with the FDA over the last year has enhanced awareness of the industrywide concerns regarding procoagulant activity and TEEs."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES