HEALTH

AccuDial presents possible solution to overdosage of OTC medication

BY Michael Johnsen

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. Parents’ confusion over correctly administering over-the-counter medication to their children appears to be shared worldwide, according to a new study presented this week in Lisbon, Portugal, by Rebekah Moles from the University of Sydney.

“We conducted our study over a five-month period, with seven fathers, 53 mothers and 37 day care workers, involving fictitious scenarios regarding children with fever-and-cold symptoms, and asked how they would handle administering medication,” Moles said. Of the 97 caregivers tested, 61% got the dosage wrong.

Almost half (44%) of the caregivers failed to quantify the right quantity and did not give enough medication, while 17% administered an overdose. “Only 14% managed the scenario properly,” Moles said.

 

In North America, the statistics on overdosing children with OTC medications are similar. According to a report published by the American Medical Association, children between the ages of 2 and 12 years inaccurately are dosed up to 73% of the time, increasing emergency room visits in two-thirds of the cases.

 

 

Recently, the daytime television show "The Doctors" featured a segment on weight-based dosing with a new pediatric, weight-based labeling product being brought to market by AccuDial Pharmaceutical. “Studies show that children are given inaccurate doses of over-the-counter medication [more than] 50% of the time,” noted Jim Sears, the show’s host. “As pediatricians, we always dose by weight. Children’s AccuDial’s weight-based label gives specific doses by weight … and it comes with its own dosing spoon, so it’s accurate.”

 

 

AccuDial’s products were approved by Health Canada 18 months ago, and presently are under consideration for approval by the Food and Drug Administration.

 

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Nearly $3 million for TB research awarded under FDA’s Critical Path Initiative

BY Alaric DeArment

SILVER SPRING, Md. The Food and Drug Administration has awarded almost $3 million for tuberculosis research, the agency said Monday.

The FDA said it awarded $2.9 million to six research products to help with the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of TB under its Critical Path Initiative. The disease has seen increasing prevalence around the world, and two recent articles by the agency’s Office of Critical Path programs noted that advances are needed to shorten therapy and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease.

The Critical Path Initiative was created in 2004 to drive innovation in the development, evaluation and manufacturing of medical products.

“FDA recognized an urgent need for the engagement and leadership of public health institutions to promote this critical, but neglected, area of medical therapeutics,” FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg said.

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Advil makers encourage safe medication disposal

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare on Monday launched a consumer campaign encouraging Americans to clean out their medicine cabinets and properly dispose of unwanted, expired and recalled products.

Pfizer also is partnering with Suzy Cohen, author of “The 24-Hour Pharmacist,” to offer essential tips on medicine cabinet safety. “This campaign encourages people to take a few simple steps to help ensure the safety of everyone in their household,” Cohen said. “We all need to declutter and clean out our medicine cabinets.”

 

Arecent poll found that nearly half of Americans do not always look at the expiration date on over-the-counter medications before taking them, Pfizer noted. And to encourage consumers to do exactly that, Pfizer is providing a coupon for a free bottle of Advil to the first 500,000 eligible people who register.

 

 

Pfizer also is encouraging consumers to properly dispose of medicines, suggesting that when disposing of unwanted, expired or recalled products in the medicine cabinet, consumers should take precautions to ensure they protect children, pets and the environment from potentially negative effects. For example, no medicine should be disposed of by pouring into a sink, toilet or storm drain. The campaign directs consumers to consult their pharmacists on proper disposal practices, or to visit FDA.gov and search for “disposal.”

 

 

For consumers who wish to register for one of the 500,000 free bottles of Advil, Pfizer has established the website MedicineCabinetSafety.com.

 

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