HEALTH

AbsolutelyNew names Copman to head corporate development

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN FRANCISCO AbsolutelyNew, a consumer products company that brings independent inventors’ best ideas to market, on Tuesday named Mark Copman, 3M Company vice president for corporate development and mergers and acquisitions, to its advisory board.

Copman currently leads 3M’s mergers and acquisitions function and advises 3M’s senior executives with respect to corporate development matters and strategic transactions.

“[Copman] brings extraordinary experience, judgment and scientific savvy to the AbsolutelyNew team,” said Richard Donat, CEO of AbsolutelyNew. “We believe his strengths will make our Advisory Board significantly stronger, which will in turn make the entire AbsolutelyNew organization a more powerful champion of innovations.”

Other AbsolutleyNew board members include Myra Hart, a retired Harvard Business School professor and founder of Staples, and Ray Brown, a former vice president of retail at Sears and Kmart.

Copman holds BS degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Political Science from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

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CRN praises FDA recall of tainted weight loss supplements

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Friday applauded the Food and Drug Administration’s expansion of its recall of 69 tainted products advertised as weight loss dietary supplements.

“It is particularly concerning that some of these weight loss products illegally contain pharmaceutical drugs, which can be especially dangerous and put consumers at risk,” stated Steve Mister, CRN president and chief executive officer. “It is unfortunate that some of these products have been marketed as dietary supplements.

Under the law, what is in the dietary supplement bottle should be listed on the label and products that break the law have no business being on store shelves,” he said. “Regardless of how it is marketed, if a weight loss product contains a drug ingredient, it is a drug under federal law.”

Mister noted that the majority of companies in the dietary supplement industry abide by the law and work hard to provide the more than 150 million Americans who take vitamins and other dietary supplements with safe, high quality and beneficial products. “We encourage consumers to be savvy when it comes to their supplements—always buy from reputable companies that you know and trust,” Mister said.

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Report: National telehealth network proposed

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK With the country focused on expanding health care to 46 million uninsured, the fact that UnitedHealth and Cisco have thought to include retail clinics into their joint telehealth solution is a nod to the important role clinics play as healthcare extenders.

 

And at a time when Congress weighs the plusses and minuses of ObamaCare, particularly the question of how to pay for the $1 trillion cost of reform, it is important to call to mind the Health Partner Study, which found that the care delivered in retail-based clinics is cheaper than that found in physician offices and urgent care.

 

 

This news is an important reminder that perhaps it doesn?t have to cost that much for healthcare reform, and that there are opportunities — as easily accessible as walking into a CVS/pharmacy or Walgreens — that deliver quality care at a fraction of the cost. That key opportunity: The retail-based clinic.

 

 

According to the Health Partner Study findings, published in late 2008, medical costs for care delivered in retail-based medical clinics, such as MinuteClinic, are between 32% and 35% less compared with care delivered in physician offices and urgent care locations. Retail-based clinics aren’t the only cost-savings opportunity. So are worksite clinics.

 

 

As recently reported by Drug Store News, the findings of a recent Take Care Health Systems’ survey underscored the importance of worksite clinics, which are growing increasingly common as U.S. employers look for ways to curb skyrocketing health care costs and bolster employee health and productivity.

 

 

That study highlights what clinic operators — like Take Care Health Systems with its 300-plus worksite clinics — have known for some time: investing in integrated workplace health and pharmacy programs can, in fact, help employers realize healthcare savings, while improving patient outcomes.

 

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