HEALTH

AAP adopts mL dosage units in place of spoons

BY Michael Johnsen

 

 
 
CHICAGO — The American Academy of Pediatrics last week urged parents, physicians and pharmacists to use only metric measurements on prescriptions, medication labels and dosing cups to help ensure kids receive the correct dose of medication. Medication should not be measured in teaspoons or tablespoons, especially not spoons taken from a kitchen drawer.
 
“Spoons come in many different sizes and are not precise enough to measure a child’s medication,” stated pediatrician Ian Paul, lead author of the policy statement, “Metric Units and the Preferred Dosing of Orally Administered Liquid Medications,” in the April 2015 Pediatrics. “For infants and toddlers, a small error – especially if repeated for multiple doses – can quickly become toxic.”
 
Each year more than 70,000 children visit emergency departments as a result of unintentional medication overdoses. Sometimes a caregiver will misinterpret milliliters for teaspoons. Another common mistake is using the wrong kind of measuring device, resulting in a child receiving two or three times the recommended dose.
 
“One tablespoon generally equals three teaspoons. If a parent uses the wrong size spoon repeatedly, this could easily lead to toxic doses,” Paul said.
 
One recent study demonstrated that medication errors are significantly less common among parents using only mL-based dosing rather than teaspoons or tablespoons.
 
The updated 2015 policy statement recommends:
 
  • Standard language should be adopted, including mL as the only appropriate abbreviation for milliliters. Liquid medications should be dosed to the nearest 0.1, 0.5, or 1 mL;
  • How often a dose is needed should be clearly stated on the label. Common language like “daily” should be used rather than medical abbreviations like ‘qd’, which could be misinterpreted as ‘qid’ (which in the past has been a common way for doctors to describe dosing four times daily);
  • Pediatricians should review mL-based doses with families when they are prescribed;
  • Dosing devices should not have extra markings that can be confusing, and should not be significantly larger than the dose described on the label, to avoid two-fold dosing errors; and
  • Manufacturers should eliminate labeling, instructions and dosing devices that contain units other than metric units.
 
“We are calling for a simple, universally recognized standard that will influence how doctors write prescriptions, how pharmacists dispense liquid medications and dosing cups, and how manufacturers print labels on their products,” Paul said.
 
This recommendation aligns with the Consumer Healthcare Products Association’s voluntary codes and guidelines on “Standard Terminology and Format for Labeling of Volumetric Measures on OTC Pediatric Orally Ingested Liquid Drug Products” which specify that for liquid products intended to be given to children less than 12 years of age, “mL” only should be used for dosing directions and on dosing devices. These guidelines were last updated on Nov. 14, 2014.
 
“CHPA and our member companies commend the American Academy of Pediatrics for its endorsement of the exclusive use of metric based dosing (mL only) to avoid dosing errors,” CHPA VP regulatory and scientific affairs Barbara Kochanowski said.“As noted in a July study published in Pediatrics, teaspoon and tablespoon units can be confusing for some parents, potentially leading to kitchen spoon use instead of the standard dosing device that comes with the medicine. Our association believes mL only labeling along with encouraging parents to read and follow the label every time will help decrease medication errors.”

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UL Consumer Products launches supplement verification program

BY Michael Johnsen

CANTON, Mass. – UL Consumer Products on Tuesday announced the launch of its Verification Program for dietary supplements.
 
"Consumers want to trust what is in the product they are taking; retailers require assurance that the products on their shelves are of the highest quality; and suppliers need to provide that trust and assurance," stated Sajeev Jesudas, president of UL Consumer United States. "Recently, the dietary supplements industry has come under increased scrutiny. From a best practice perspective, an approach that drives transparency into industry quality assurance programs can help increase consumer knowledge, drive brand awareness and loyalty, and support bottom-line improvements. The UL Verification Program for dietary supplements is a major milestone for UL and a natural fit for an industry in transition."   
 
Clients who participate in the Verification Program and qualify based on the UL ClearView program guidelines may use UL's new Verified Mark on their products, packaging and promotional items. The UL Verified Mark provides third-party verification. The UL Verified Mark confirms that the ingredients listed on the label are in the product. 
 
"Extensive research revealed that a UL Verified Mark would be welcomed by the dietary supplements industry and many current UL clients have indicated they would place a high value on the opportunity to earn the UL Verified Mark," says Michael O'Hara, general manager of global nutraceuticals for UL. "Because UL plays such an important role in the marketplace as a safety certifier, the core of UL's business, the new UL Dietary Supplements Verification Program is designed and intended to enhance our current safety certification programs."
 

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Kimberly-Clark introduces Poise Thin-Shape pads with humorous campaign

BY Michael Johnsen

 
 
DALLAS — Kimberly-Clark's Poise brand on Tuesday launched new Poise Thin-Shape pads to help more women manage their light bladder leakage effectively and with confidence. New Poise Thin-Shape pads are up to 40% thinner than original Poise brand pads and are made specifically for those common little leaks triggered by every day occurrences like laughing, sneezing and exercising, with the trusted absorbency of the Poise brand.
 
Many of the one in three women who experience light bladder leakage rely on period pads to take care of their bladder leaks because they are not yet aware of solutions specifically designed for LBL, Kimberly-Clark noted. 
 
Designed to move with a woman’s body, new Poise Thin-Shape pads offer comfort and protection with Super Absorbent Material, a dry touch layer, leak block sides, an Absorb-loc core that quickly locks away wetness and odor and a Thin-Flex design for protection that’s three times drier than period pads.
 
“For more than 20 years, the Poise brand has been committed to understanding and creating product innovations that meet women’s evolving feminine needs,” said Breanna Kuhn, Poise brand manager, Kimberly-Clark. “New Poise Thin-Shape pads are the latest example of that commitment and we encourage women to make the right choice for their LBL and experience the extraordinary difference and outstanding protection that Poise offers vs. period-only pads and liners.”
 
The Poise brand is supporting the launch of new Poise Thin-Shape pads with an unexpected marketing approach and commercial program that lightheartedly encourages women with LBL to take their unused period pads and turn them into "something awesome." The program also includes television advertising, digital partnerships, product sampling and retail support.

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