HEALTH

3M, American Red Cross launch 4th annual Nexcare blood drive

BY Michael Johnsen

ST. PAUL, Minn. — 3M on Monday announced the fourth annual Nexcare give program, a nationwide initiative that in partnership with the American Red Cross helps raise awareness around the need for blood donations.

“We are so grateful to all donors for their lifesaving work. Each blood donation can help save up to three lives, so what better way to serve your community than by giving blood regularly,” said Dan Waxman, president of America’s Blood Centers.

This year, the Nexcare give program reminds people that “Giving Blood is Timeless” through a collection of limited-edition bandage designs inspired by trends from past decades. The World Health Organization’s World Blood Donor Day is June 14. Nexcare give bandages will be distributed at blood centers nationwide that week, beginning Monday, June 11. The bandage collection also is available by going to Nexcaregive.com.

The limited edition collection of Nexcare give Bandages features patterns based on iconic trends of decades past. Inspired by fashion, design and pop culture from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, the 2012 Nexcare give bandage collection will serve as a nostalgic reminder for current and potential donors that “Giving Blood is Timeless.” The collection includes designs ranging from retro polka dots and tie-dye to grunge plaid.


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ProPhase plans intensive marketing campaign for next cough-cold season

BY Michael Johnsen

DOYLESTOWN, Pa. — The lackluster cough-cold season will necessitate a greater need for marketing and promotion next season, ProPhase Labs chairman and CEO Ted Karkus said on Thursday in announcing first-quarter results for the period ended March 31.

ProPhase Labs reported higher net sales of 87.5% to $6 million for the period though the company incurred a net loss of $688,000, or ($0.05) per share. That sharp increase in net sales were "attributable to the success of our marketing efforts in late fiscal 2011," Karkus noted. "Our marketing strategies led to increased consumer purchases in late fiscal 2011, as a consequence of which, our retailers placed larger stock replenishment orders in the first quarter of 2012 to maintain their inventory levels," he said.

However, the second half of the cough-cold season never materialized, which means there is still plenty of inventory in the supply chain. To help move more of that inventory out of the stores and into consumer medicine cabinets for the next season, ProPhase will need to increase its marketing presence.

"In order to continue to grow revenues from year to year, we plan to continue to invest strategically in a fully integrated marketing campaign in conjunction with in-store promotional support [for the 2012-2013 season]," Karkus said. "These increased expenses in building our brand impact our short term profitability … We believe that our current capital reserves are sufficient to fund an effective marketing campaign for the 2012-2013 cold season in order to continually increase the value of the Cold-Eeze brand."


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Kalorama: Despite predictions to the contrary, OTC drug market not recession-proof

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Despite predictions that consumers in recessionary times would flock to cheaper over-the-counter drugs, the world’s over-the-counter drug market grew just 3.5% in the past three years, according a report released by Kalorama Information.

"Results over the past few years may put to bed the theory that OTC drug sales go up during a recession," Kalorama Information publisher Bruce Carlson said. "It’s something that was broadly predicted, including in our own reports. It turns out that OTC drugs were affected by consumers having less cash in their pockets just as much as other products were."

According to the report, the $78 billion market for over-the-counter medicines behaved as many products in the recent recession did: almost no sales growth in 2009 and slowly increasing but below average growth in the past two years.

Kalorama supplied a few possible reasons for the slow growth: consumers reduced doctor visits and sought to trim all medical expenditures since 2009, which dampened the benefit from customers preferring lower-priced OTC drugs; lower-priced drug store brands competed well with brand-name products, reducing prices paid; and increasing numbers of patients insured through Medicaid and Medicare were better able to purchase prescription products, reducing the need for OTC purchases.


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