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IAF: 10 U.S. states will see highest diabetes prevalence, cost

WASHINGTON — A new study conducted by the Institute for Alternative Futures and funded by Novo Nordisk highlighted the top 10 U.S. states that are labeled as "diabetes hot spots" and are projected to carry the brunt of the epidemic over the next 15 years.

The IAF diabetes model projected that the overall number of people in the United States living with diabetes will increase 64% by 2025 to 53.1 million, or 1-in-7 Americans. In turn, the medical and societal cost of diabetes will be almost $514 billion, a 72% increase from 2010, IAF said. Breaking down the statistics, IAF projected the following states will carry the biggest diabetes burden:

  1. California: Projected cost of $63.63 billion, 6.6 million people with diabetes;

  2. Texas: Projected cost of $52.17 billion; 5.5 million people with diabetes;

  3. Florida: Projected cost of $40.43 billion; 4.2 million people with diabetes;

  4. New York: Projected cost of $28.38 billion; 2.9 million people with diabetes;

  5. Ohio: Projected cost of $19.76 billion; 2.1 million people with diabetes;

  6. Illinois: Projected cost of $19.67 billion; 2 million people with diabetes;

  7. Georgia: Projected cost of $19.54 billion; 2 million people with diabetes;

  8. Pennsylvania: Projected cost of $18.37 billion; 1.9 million people with diabetes;

  9. North Carolina: Projected cost of $17.91 billion; 1.9 million people with diabetes; and

  10. Michigan: Projected cost of $15.85 billion; 1.6 million people with diabetes.

Currently the 10 states carry nearly 60% of diabetes-related costs.

The IAF study was based on available national diabetes data, including the recent CDC projections to 2050, as well as population projections.

"This research maps the alarming demographic realities of diabetes through 2025 if we don't make fundamental changes, particularly in our lifestyles and health system," said William Robert Rowley, senior fellow at the Institute for Alternative Futures and lead author of the study. "The burden of diabetes will not fall equally. To change this tragic trajectory, it is imperative that public and private agencies work together on national, as well as state and local levels."

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